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Review of Srikanth: This inspirational biography features Rajkummar Rao, who dazzles you with his humour and tenacity.

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Review of Srikanth: This inspirational biography features Rajkummar Rao, who dazzles you with his humour and tenacity.

Review of Srikanth’s film

Due to his vision impairment, Srikanth Bolla is essentially limited to dreaming. He decides to dream big and to pursue those aspirations no matter what. His life mottos include “There is nothing I cannot do,” “I can’t run, so I must fight,” and “If others can, Sri also can.” He’s not requesting assistance. He need direction and coaching. He wants no one to feel sorry for him because of his restrictions. He desires to be treated fairly. Together with authors Jagdeep Siddhu and Sumit Purohit, director Tushar Hiranandani skillfully combines all these elements into a straightforward yet powerful story in this biographical film about Srikanth.

“Main hero nahi ban raha, main hero hoon,” declares Rajkummar Rao, portraying Srikanth with perfect precision. That pretty much sums up his role in the movie. He is the centre of Srikanth’s universe and his idol, and he gives an impeccable performance from beginning to end. Rao’s amazing performance keeps the ship afloat even when the story, writing, or pacing of the movie falters. It’s difficult to ignore the amount of time and work that went into this character’s preparation, which is evident in each and every frame. There is little sympathy felt in the scene where Srikanth bangs his forehead on the ground and sobs in front of his instructor, declaring he doesn’t want to beg, but demonstrates his tenacity and power.

The storyline

The narrative starts in July 1992 in Machilipatnam, Andhra Pradesh, when Srikanth (Rajkummar Rao) is born to Damodar Bolla (Srivinas Beesetty) and Venkatamma Bolla (Anusha Nuthula). The father is overjoyed to have his first child—a boy, as this is considered auspicious—and names him after his favourite cricket player, Krishnamachari Srikkanth. However, his world falls apart when he learns that his kid is blind. He weeps, feeling powerless, and is ready to bury their kid alive when neighbours urge him to do so, but his wife intervenes.

Though it only lasts a few minutes, the movie depicts Srikanth’s early years as a victim of bullying from other children who thought he was worthless and would eventually become a “blind beggar.” Soon after, Srikanth gets accepted into a special school in Hyderabad for the blind. There, he meets Devika (Jyothika), a teacher who not only helps him with his academics but also teaches him how to walk independently.

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Up until now, even though I love watching Rao on screen, I was unable to comprehend the age group he was portraying since it was obvious that the filmmakers weren’t too concerned with the finer points of his look. Rao appears a little too fake for a student in school. However, at this point in the movie, the focus shifts to the Indian educational system, which prevents visually impaired students from choosing science as their major beyond class 10. With all of their effort, Srikanth and Devika wage a court battle to get him admittance to the preferred school. Colleges follow the same regulations when it comes to higher education, though. In this case, Srikanth defies all expectations and, after being turned down by every Indian institution, receives an invitation from one of the top 4 universities in the world and accepts a full scholarship to MIT in Boston, Massachusetts. For a youngster who was raised in a countryside, American life looks a little too posh, and he doesn’t perceive any particular difficulties. After taking many different paths in life, he returned to India to fulfil his ambitions and become a businessman with Bollant Industries. At that point, some strong and skillfully written scenes depict Srikanth’s last ascent and brief descent.

Srikanth does a good job of bringing attention to the lack of understanding in our culture for the challenges faced by those with disabilities. The movie clarifies the prejudices that are present in the system of education and employment prospects. It is seen in a scenario where Srikanth is trying to get investors for his firm and one of the companies, not wanting to give him a big sum of money, tries to get him involved in Diwali candle-making, a task that has long been linked with the blind.

The Defect in Our Reverse

Although Srikanth clocks in at precisely 132 minutes, the first half is unquestionably better. There’s a sense of urgency, interest, and wonder about what Srikanth would do next to fulfil his aspirations. The plot absolutely falters in the second half, which I thought veered off course a little too much and indulged in some character exaltation that had been mostly avoided until the intermission. The passages in which Srikanth is revealed to have become resentful, envious, and insecure against the very individuals who made it possible for him to thrive are masterfully written and immediately relatable.

Although Srikanth is not superman, he is capable of doing almost anything—and with a heroic twist—and Hiranandani has done a great job in portraying it by capturing some amazing moments. He succeeds academically as well as athletically, earning a berth on the Indian National Cricket Team, but he gives that up to continue his studies overseas. Another moment he leaves you completely speechless is when he gets to the airport and is refused boarding because, according to airline policy, a visually impaired person must have an accompanying person when they travel. The events that transpire and the way Sri resolves the matter not only make you grin, but they also serve as a subtly harsh reality check on the existing system, which does not treat PwDs fairly.

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The movie is full of these kinds of incidents, all aimed at exposing society’s unwillingness to provide for the needs of the blind. The fact that it’s done to provide equal opportunities for them rather than to inspire sympathy is admirable. At the end of the movie, there’s a speech, or rather a monologue, that is meant to summarise what Srikanth wants the world to know about the community of people who are visually impaired. However, I thought the movie had already done enough in the previous two hours to express all that needed to be said. Indeed, the filmmakers skillfully employed Srikanth’s humour to break the film’s didactic tone with a few scattered laughs.

In addition to Rao’s faultless performance, Jyotika is equally proficient and gives a controlled performance. She not only allows Srikanth follow his own path, but also provides him the necessary grounding. Jyotika has some of the most charming and enjoyable moments with Rao, thanks to her charming on-screen persona and perfect emotional balancing. As Ravi Mantha, Sharad Kelkar plays a buddy, elder brother, and business associate who invests in and gives Srikanth’s dream project wings. Even in difficult times, Kelkar stays composed and a silent source of strength, understanding Srikanth’s vision. Jameel Khan plays Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam, and his portrayal of Kalam literally leaves you speechless. He has some really touching moments with Srikanth.

In an attempt to address a number of significant facets of Srikanth’s biography, the movie also depicts his romantic life, with Swathi (Alaya F) growing fond of him on social media after reading about all of his accomplishments. They click right away, and love grows, but you can see Alaya coming and departing whenever she pleases. Undoubtedly, her character might have been more complex, and the screenplay could have done a better job of incorporating the full love tale component. Despite having little on screen time, Alaya F makes an impression.

A review of this movie would be lacking if it did not address Rao’s fellow hero. Aditya Dev’s song for Papa Kehte Hain gives Srikanth’s trip more soul. You feel energised and dragged back into the movie every time the music plays, be it the opening titles or the background during some of the plot’s most dramatic moments.

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Srikanth is only presenting the facts; he is not preaching. It emphasises that even if some people are blind or visually impaired, they still have vision, and it never attempts to portray them as less fortunate. Srikanth is a touching story that inspires and restores self-belief, with a tonne of comedy subtly woven throughout to maintain the gravity of the topic. You can succeed if Sri can.

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Bollywood

Sunny Deol in the middle of a storm: Film producers accuse her of lying, cheating, and forging

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Sunny Deol in the middle of a storm: Film producers accuse her of lying, cheating, and forging

Actor-MP Sunny Deol is the target of alarming accusations of cheating, extortion, and forgery made by film producer Sorav Gupta (of Sundawn Entertainment Pvt Ltd). The real estate developer turned producer Gupta claimed in a press conference earlier this week that Sunny Deol had taken money from him in advance to film a movie in 2016, kept taking more money while he promised to start the project, but ultimately never finished it after his most recent movie, Gadar 2, became a big hit.

Gupta reveals that he agreed to pay 4cr to get Sunny Deol play the lead in his movie in 2016. We paid him 1cr in advance, but he chose to film for Poster Boys instead of beginning my film (2017) as an alternative. Despite my repeated requests for more money, my ₹2.55cr is currently in Sunny ji’s account. In addition, he forced me to hire an executive producer, book Filmistaan studio, and pay money to another filmmaker, according to Gupta.

Additionally, the producer claims that in 2023, Deol falsified a contract with his business. He reveals, “After reading the agreement, we were shocked to learn that the beech wala had been changed. Jahan par fees ka amount ₹4cr ko badha kar ₹8cr kar diya aur profit to ₹2cr kar diya.”

During the same press conference, filmmaker Suneel Darshan, who is best known for films like Janwar (1999) and Andaaz (2003), defended Gupta and claimed that he had experienced the same problem with Sunny Deol. “Sunny Deol only paid a portion of the rights to my 1996 film Ajay, which she obtained for international release. The remaining amount was never sent,” Darshan continues. “Eventually, Sunny asked me to collaborate on a project with him, telling me to “have faith in me, help me out,” and obtaining payment from me once more.

Under condition of anonymity, an industry source informs us that Deol has a reputation for breaking deals he signs with multiple producers. He has a long history of stirring up problems. A producer in Mumbai built a massive set for a movie named Ram Janmbhumi, which Sunny had handed him the bound script for. Sunny agreed to pay ₹5cr for the project. However, after delivering a hit film, he later declined to visit the sets and wanted ₹25cr in remuneration (Gadar 2, 2023).

Gupta discloses that he has reported Deol to the police. On April 30, the police sent [Deol] a notice. According to Gupta, his staff sent a letter stating that he was out of town on the day he was supposed to appear.

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Entertainment News Platforms – anyflix.in      
Construction Infrastructure and Mining News Platform – https://cimreviews.com/
General News Platform – https://ihtlive.com/
Podcast Platforms – https://anyfm.in

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