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How to ovulate expertly: What is premature ovarian failure?

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How to ovulate expertly: What is premature ovarian failure?

Ovulation, when the egg is released from the ovary of the dominant follicle into the fallopian tube, is a part of this cycle and occurs during the six days of a woman’s menstrual cycle when sexual activity can result in pregnancy. It is crucial to monitor ovulation because it creates a fertile window, which consists of the five days prior to ovulation as well as the day of ovulation, during which there is a greater chance of conception.

Every woman has millions of eggs from menarche, the start of her period, until menopause, the end of her period. However, only one egg ripens each month, so the menstrual cycle starts on the first day of the period, when the uterine lining first forms. Even though we have millions of eggs, the brain then releases the hormone FSH, which stimulates just one egg to develop. For the first 14 days, the egg also produces the hormone oestrogen, which thickens the uterine lining.

Another hormone called luteinizing hormone, or LH, is produced when the egg is prepared to hatch. The egg ruptures and is taken up by the fallopian tube as a result of the LH surge, Dr. Kiran Coelho, Consultant, Gynecology and Obstetrics at PD Hinduja Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Khar Facility, explained in an interview with HT Lifestyle. The following day, it will stay in the fallopian tube. This is the ovulation process. The sperms can successfully impregnate the egg for 72 hours. Therefore, the egg will be fertilised in the fallopian tube, leading to pregnancy, if the couple has had sexual activity in the past and the sperm are waiting or if the couple has sexual activity within the next 24 hours.

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However, in the majority of cycles, the egg expires after 24 hours and the lining appears as the monthly period after 14 days. The menstrual cycle looks like this.

“The couple must know when ovulation occurs if they want to become pregnant so that they don’t miss the crucial 24 hours,” she advised. Therefore, if a person has regular cycles, ovulation typically occurs 14 days before the following period. This is equivalent to 10 to 14 days in a cycle of 28 days. The calendar approach is this. The basal body temperature can also be determined. Every day, a fertility thermometer measures the rectal temperature. The temperature rises by one degree after ovulation as a result of the LH effect. 

The third method, which involves ovulation induction kits, is also very dependable and readily available, said Dr. Kiran Coelho. Urine can be checked daily to see if an LH surge has occurred. Ovulation will happen on the day the LH surge is detected, and the couple can have sexual activity on that day. Sonography-based follicular studies are the fourth technique. In order to target the actual development and rupture of the ovulation, the follicle study is performed on the 10th day of your cycle and then every other day after that. These are the various techniques for figuring out if you’re ovulating and, if so, when you are.

The average woman’s reproductive life is 20 to 40 years. Therefore, ovulation becomes irregular between the ages of 30 and 35, and between the ages of 35 and 40, ovulation is quite irregular, necessitating the use of ovulation induction medication, which involves the administration of drugs to produce the egg, ripen it, and rupture.

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The amount of fertile eggs a female has, also known as the ovarian reserve, or the number of eggs that can be fertilised, can be assessed using a test called anti Mullerian hormone (AMH). Dr. Kiran Coelho added, “A female can learn from that test how fertile she is and how many eggs she has. A woman might have her eggs frozen if she wants to put off getting pregnant. Egg freezing is an option for younger women who don’t want to have children. Several eggs are simulated, extracted, and frozen in this procedure. When a woman wants to become pregnant, IVF can be done, and embryos are created.

Ovulation typically happens 13 to 15 days before the beginning of each cycle, according to Dr. Kshitiz Murdia, CEO and Co-Founder of Indira IVF, who added his expertise to the topic. Ovulation timing varies from person to person and cycle to cycle, just like menstruation does. The ideal day for ovulation if a cycle is 28 days long is around day 14. Maintaining a tracking calendar, using ovulation prediction kits, and keeping an eye out for ovulation symptoms like mild pain, increased libido, tender breasts, and amount of vaginal discharge are all options for tracking ovulation.

“At around 40 years of age, the consistency of ovulation and the risk of infertility get impacted with age,” he continued. As a result, one would need to be under medical supervision in such circumstances in order to have a successful pregnancy. They may be recommended for egg freezing, cryopreservation, PGTA embryo preservation, IVF, IUI, and other infertility treatment procedures depending on the diagnosis.

Premature ovarian failure and menopause are two different conditions, despite the fact that many people mistake them for one another. Premature menopause is defined as the ovaries ceasing to function before the age of 40, according to Dr. Kiran Coelho. The ovaries stop working premature ovarian failure as well. Although a woman cannot conceive and has no ovulation during premature menopause, this is not the case with premature ovarian failure.

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Both illnesses share the same symptoms, she noted. Among them are infertility and irregular periods, as well as oestrogen deprivation symptoms like hot flashes, irritability, irregular periods, lack of sleep, bloating, dry skin, frequent vaginal infections, loss of libido, dryness of the vagina, painful intercourse, and mood swings.

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Study: Maternal obesity more accurately predicts risk of heart disease than pregnancy issues.

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Study: Maternal obesity more accurately predicts risk of heart disease than pregnancy issues.

Maternal health during pregnancy is a critical factor in the well-being of both the mother and the child. While a range of issues can arise during pregnancy, new research suggests that maternal obesity may be a more accurate predictor of heart disease risk than specific complications during pregnancy. This study sheds light on the long-term health implications of obesity and emphasizes the importance of addressing this public health concern. In this blog, we’ll explore the findings of this study and their broader implications.

A Stronger Predictor of Heart Disease Risk than Pregnancy Complications

A recent study published in a medical journal has attracted attention for its focus on maternal obesity and its impact on future heart disease risk. Researchers conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of women who had given birth in the past decade, tracking their health outcomes over time. The study found that maternal obesity is a more robust predictor of heart disease risk than specific pregnancy complications like gestational diabetes or pre-eclampsia.

Key Findings

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  1. Long-term Risk: The study’s findings suggest that maternal obesity is associated with a significantly higher risk of heart disease in the years following pregnancy. This highlights the importance of addressing obesity as a long-term health concern, not just a temporary condition associated with pregnancy.
  2. Preeclampsia and Gestational Diabetes: While preeclampsia and gestational diabetes are well-known complications of pregnancy that can impact maternal health, the study found that these conditions did not have as strong a correlation with future heart disease risk as maternal obesity.
  3. Weight Management: The study underscores the importance of proactive weight management for women before, during, and after pregnancy. It highlights that addressing obesity may have a more significant impact on reducing heart disease risk than solely focusing on managing specific pregnancy-related complications.

Implications

  1. Public Health Focus: Maternal obesity is a critical public health issue that extends beyond pregnancy. This research reinforces the need for society and healthcare systems to prioritize weight management and obesity prevention strategies to reduce the long-term health risks associated with obesity.
  2. Holistic Approach: Healthcare providers should consider a holistic approach to maternal health that includes not only addressing pregnancy-related issues but also focusing on a woman’s overall well-being, including weight management and cardiovascular health.
  3. Education and Support: Women planning to become pregnant or already expecting should receive information, education, and support regarding the importance of maintaining a healthy weight before and after childbirth. Health professionals can play a vital role in providing guidance and resources.

The findings of this study highlight the critical role that maternal obesity plays in predicting future heart disease risk, even more so than specific pregnancy complications. This research serves as a call to action for healthcare providers, policymakers, and society as a whole to prioritize the prevention and management of obesity to safeguard the long-term health of women and reduce their risk of heart disease. Addressing this public health issue early can lead to healthier mothers, healthier pregnancies, and ultimately healthier families.

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